Danger: Journalists Crossing

Latino Social Innovation’s first executive produced short film is finally available.  

“Danger: Journalists Crossing” is a raw and hilarious political satire that questions the ethical underpinnings of mainstream media and the role journalists play in harboring negative stereotypes of Central American migrants.  The film was directed by veteran social movement filmmaker Greg Berger, known in Mexico as Gringoyo.

This film embodies participatory media in its most authentic form.  More than 80 migrants participated in the making of the film, including the fierce organizers, main protagonists, and leaders of this year’s “Via Crucis”, a migrant-led 268 mile-march that brings attention to the plight of migrants.  “Danger: Journalists Crossing” is the product of an organized network of more than 250 people, and 103 individual supporters, who in only seven days fully funded our kickstarter campaign.

The film is already having an impact and is being used as an organizing tool by the same people who appear in it.  They premiered it in Chahuites, Oaxaca, Mexico, at a shelter and rest stop of the Via Crucis march. The making of “Danger: Journalists Crossing,” revealed the organizers' overwhelming desire and enthusiasm to create more of their own media.  Members of the migrant movement want to collect, document, analyze and disseminate their own stories, not only to counter the media's negative portrayal of migrants but also to strengthen their organizing efforts and movement building strategies.

As one of the executive producers of this political satire, we wanted the film to shatter the narrative of migrants as victims and criminals. Now, after observing its overwhelming impact, we see the potential for the creation of a migrants’ community media lab in Southern Mexico.

The Central American organizers who appear in this film are brave, skilled, and ready to accomplish great things.  Despite death threats and the imminent danger of torture and kidnapping, they continue to stand up and organize against corruption and organized crime.

 Would you like to help us build a media lab?  There are many ways to get involved.  Join our mailing list.

Name
Name

Gain Strategies and Skills to Support Social Movements

A digital workshop for journalists, storytellers, media-makers, and community organizers.

Join us for a limited admission digital workshop organized by Latino Social Innovation on behalf of the School of Authentic Journalism. Learn directly from experienced and accomplished journalists and world-renowned organizers of some of the most effective social movements from recent history, including Oscar Olivera, who was spokesperson for the movement to end water privatization in Bolivia, and Greg Berger, filmmaker and Co-Director of the Viral Video team of the School of Authentic Journalism. Topics will include:

· Political satire in collaboration with social movements.

· Communicating the story of a movement.

· How to make media go viral.

· Strategic dynamics of nonviolent movements.

This workshop will provide participants with better skills for reporting on social movements. Who knows? You may find yourself applying to the School of Authentic Journalism, which convenes in Mexico every year, to teach the art of effectively communicating the stories that help social movements to create real-world political impact using all forms of available media. The School of Authentic Journalism is the world’s only tuition-free and bilingual school on the subject, highly competitive since scholarships are only granted to a few dozen students per year.

Sign-up Deadline:

before 12PM Wednesday, May 20

Digital Workshop will take place in July and is open only to contributors to the 2015 School of Authentic Journalism Kickstarter campaign. 


Space is limited.

Sign up by selecting the Digital Workshop reward on Kickstarter:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1652340249/the-2015-school-of-authentic-journalism https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1652340249/the-2015-school-of-authentic-journalism

For more information contact 646-240-5986 or eliana@latinosocialinnovation.org

http://www.pinterest.com/carlitoseliana/

Gain Strategies and Skills to Support Social Movements

Latino Social Innovation May 19, 2015 Gain Strategies and Skills to Support Social Movements

A digital workshop for journalists, storytellers, media-makers and organizers

Learn directly from experienced and accomplished journalists and world-renowned organizers of some of the most effective social movements.

-- Headline goes here Join us for a limited admission digital workshop organized by Latino Social Innovation on behalf of the School of Authentic Journalism. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn directly from experienced and accomplished journalists and world-renowned organizers of some of the most effective social movements from recent history, including Oscar Oliversa, who was spokesperson for the movement to end water privatization in Bolivia, and Greg Berger, filmmaker and Co-Director of the Viral Video team of the School of Authentic Journalism.

Political satire in collaboration with social movements. Communicating the story of a movement. How to make media go viral. Strategic dynamics of nonviolent movements. This workshop will provide participatns with better skills for reporting on social movements. Who knows? You may find yourself applying to the School of Authentic Journalism, which convenes in Mexico every year, to teach the art of effectively communicating the stories that help social movements to create real-world political impact using all forms of available media. The School of Authentic Journalism is the world's only tuition-free and bilingual school on the subject, highly competitive since scholarships are only granted to a few dozen students per year. Sign-up Deadline: Wednesday, May 20 @12PM

This digital workshop will take place in July. Space is limited and it is open only to contributors to the 2015 School of Authentic Journalism Kickstarter campaign.
Sign up by selecting the Digital Workshop reward on Kickstarter. Reduced price for students and organizers.

SIGN UP HERE https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1652340249/the-2015-school-of-authentic-journalism

Questions:
eliana@latinosocialinnovation.org 646-240-5986

IF YOU NO LONGER WISH TO RECEIVE EMAILS PLEASE UNSUBSCRIBE

2015 LATINO SOCIAL INNOVATION, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

http://www.latinosocialinnovation.org/

IDEAS OCUPADORAS: Behind an idea ocupadora, there is often a personal story.

I was 13 years old when I arrived in the United States from Bolivia. My first time on a plane was a frightening experience, but I couldn’t wait to hug my mom and to get to know my new dad. My vision of perpetual happiness, open arms and fire works in America came to an end when school started. I didn’t know English.

The other students were unfriendly and sometimes mean. I spent months eating lunch alone, sitting on the floor next to my locker. School administrators wanted to keep me back a few years without giving me a chance. At school, everyone thought I would fail.

I felt inferior, unwanted and unwelcome. I quickly grew ashamed about the color of my skin, the language I spoke, and the country I came from.

I know there are children in every part of the country for whom my story is all too familiar, and because of this, I have dedicated myself to creating alternative spaces that foster cultural and social opportunity and to building support systems for immigrant communities.

Fueled by my deep respect and appreciation for immigrants, and with the help of some of the most creative people in East Harlem, New York, I opened an art gallery out of my apartment, ran ESL classes at a church, produced concerts, film festivals, and multidisciplinary performances. I opened Art for Change, a nonprofit art for social change organization, which I handed off the moment we could hire people. I opened a successful cultural Peña, which was closed due to gentrification and the high costs of real estate in New York City. I even moved my family to Mexico in an attempt to start a lending platform aimed at mobilizing diasporas to finance cooperative development in their countries of origin. I created, experimented, succeeded, but also failed.

Today, with my current social venture Latino Social Innovation https://www.facebook.com/LatinoSocialInnovation, I want to put myself out there once again, with a new dream of home-delivering children's books to Latino families with DéjàLu https://www.facebook.com/aboutdejalu. This one has an incredible team of dreamers and advisors. You can read about it at the following link but please like us on FB:

http://masschallenge.org/startups/2015/profile/dejalu-

I want to thank all of the people who did give me a chance, who created and built with me, who hired me, who funded me, who always came through. Thank you. We have a pretty good chance at joining the MAssChallenge but even if we don’t, I’m prepared to move mountains so that children, who speak Spanish at home, will never feel ashamed of their language and their culture. I’m certainly in good company: Nathaniel Curtis, Anthony Grate, Leticia Perelstein, Maria Fernanda Garcia Munera, Veronica Olivera, Anna Smukowski, Claudia Peres, Ajoy Basu, Beth Yohai and Oliver Sanchez.

Eliana Godoy Social Impact Strategist

@carlitoseliana @latsocinnovate @dejalu_books http://www.pinterest.com/carlitoseliana/

IDEAS OCUPADORAS: Behind an idea ocupadora, there is often a personal story.

Behind an idea ocupadora, there is often a personal story:

I was 13 years old when I arrived in the United States from Bolivia. My first time on a plane was a frightening experience, but I couldn’t wait to hug my mom and to get to know my new dad. My vision of perpetual happiness, open arms and fire works in America came to an end when school started. I didn’t know English. The other students were unfriendly and sometimes mean. I spent months eating lunch alone, sitting on the floor next to my locker. School administrators wanted to keep me back a few years without giving me a chance. At school, everyone thought I would fail.

I felt inferior, unwanted and unwelcome. I quickly grew ashamed about the color of my skin, the language I spoke, and the country I came from.

I know there are children in every part of the country for whom my story is all too familiar, and because of this, I have dedicated myself to creating alternative spaces that foster cultural and social opportunity and to building support systems for immigrant communities.

Fueled by my deep respect and appreciation for immigrants, and with the help of some of the most creative people in East Harlem, New York, I opened an art gallery out of my apartment, ran ESL classes at a church, produced concerts, film festivals, and multidisciplinary performances. I opened Art for Change, a nonprofit art for social change organization, which I handed off the moment we could hire people. I opened a successful cultural Peña, which was closed due to gentrification and the high costs of real estate in New York City. I even moved my family to Mexico in an attempt to start a lending platform aimed at mobilizing diasporas to finance cooperative development in their countries of origin. I created, experimented, succeeded, but also failed. Today, I want to put myself out there once again, with a new dream:

http://masschallenge.org/startups/2015/profile/dejalu http://masschallenge.org/startups/2015/profile/dejalu-

I want to thank all of the people who did give me a chance, who created and built with me, who hired me, who funded me, who always came through. Thank you. We have a pretty good chance at winning the MAssChallenge but even if we don’t, I’m prepared to move mountains so that children, who speak Spanish at home, will never feel ashamed of their language and their culture. I’m certainly in good company: Nathaniel Curtis, Anthony Grate, Leticia Perelstein, Maria Fernanda Garcia Munera, Veronica Olivera, Anna Smukowski, Claudia Peres, Ajoy Basu, Beth Yohai and Oliver Sanchez.

Eliana Godoy Social Impact Strategist 646-240-5986 www.latinosocialinnovation.org http://latinosocialinnovation.org/aaronswartzexhibit/ https://twitter.com/LatSocInnovate http://instagram.com/carlitoseliana https://www.facebook.com/LatinoSocialInnovation http://www.pinterest.com/carlitoseliana/ http://www.pinterest.com/carlitoseliana/